Tags: harley quinn

cassandraclare:

Inspired of course by by Joanna Russ. And not set off by anything in particular, just an aggregate of comments and a good friend being treated terribly for posting some of her fiction for free online.

She tweets and tumblrs so she must not be working.
She never tweets…
"Get scared. It will do you good. Smoke a bit, stare blankly at some ceilings, beat your head against some walls, refuse to see some people, paint and write. Get scared some more. Allow your little mind to do nothing but function. Stay inside, go out - I don’t care what you’ll do; but stay scared as hell. You will never be able to experience everything. So, please, do poetical justice to your soul and simply experience yourself."

Albert Camus, from Notebooks, 1951-1959  (via brainwaveparticles)

(via jimchuck)

"I don’t know why people teach kids about ‘pimples’ and ‘hormones’ and ‘armpit hair’, and refrain from telling them that if they don’t achieve their billion-dollar dreams at the age of twenty-one, there will still be much more to life. And that when you fail at your first job, it isn’t going to be the end of the world. And eventually you will realize that each person’s world is different and your only job is to figure out what your best world can be."

Hannah Hart, My Drunk Kitchen

the realest life advice you will ever get 

(via helbigandswift)

(via mistybay)

bisexuallibrarian:

huffingtonpost:

Schooled  Larry King.

Watch the full interview here.

Dear Larry King: Please ask all single straight people if they are “non-practicing heterosexuals.”  

(via quotemeonit)

Well I’m looking down deep inside you
And I want to climb in but I can’t do it
I’m so scared of what I might find there
Do you have something to hide
And you can’t show it?

I think I’m getting hot
Try to connect the dots
You’re on your tip toes trying hard not to get caught
Some things are unexplained
Some people can’t be tamed
But I want to know everything

(Source: 5ia)

dynamicafrica:

Today, September 8th, is the 60th birthday of Ruby Nell Bridges - a woman who, being the first black child to attend an all-white school in New Orleans in 1960, underwent a traumatizing ordeal that came to signify the deeply troubled state of race relations in America.

On her first day of school at William Frantz Elementary School, during a 1997 NewsHour interview Bridges recalled that she was perplexed by the site that befell, thinking that it was some sort of Mardi Gras celebration:

"Driving up I could see the crowd, but living in New Orleans, I actually thought it was Mardi Gras. There was a large crowd of people outside of the school. They were throwing things and shouting, and that sort of goes on in New Orleans at Mardi Gras.”

Only six-years-old at the time, little Ruby had to deal with a slew of disgusting and violent harassment, beginning with threats of violence that prompted then President Eisenhower to dispatch U.S Marshals as her official escorts, to teachers refusing to teach her and a woman who put a black baby doll in a coffin and demonstrated outside the school in protest of Ruby’s presence there. This particular ordeal had a profound effect on young Ruby who said that it “scared me more than the nasty things people screamed at us.”

Only one teacher, Barbara Henry, would teach Ruby and did so for over a year with Ruby being the only pupil in her class.

The Bridges family suffered greatly for their brave decision. Her father lost his job, they were barred from shopping at their local grocery store, her grandparents, who were sharecroppers, were forcibly removed from their land, not to mention the psychological effect this entire ordeal had on her family. There were, however, members of their community - both black and white - who gathered behind the Bridges family in a show of support, including providing her father with a new job and taking turns to babysit Ruby.

Part of her experience was immortalized in a 1964 Norman Rockwell painting, pictured above, titled The Problem We All Live With. Her entire story was made into a TV movie released in 1998.

Despite the end of the segregation of schools in the United States, studies and reports show that the situation is worse now than it was in the 1960s.

Today, still living in New Orleans, Briges works as an activist, who has spoken at TEDx, and is now chair of the Ruby Bridges Foundation.

(via aintnobodysbusinessifido)

hatzigsut:

very chilling topic on twitter right now. 

i have my own reasons for #WhyIStayed, and looking through this hashtag, i can see so many women and men who were lost, just as i was.

i stayed because it was the first time i felt important to anyone. he “loved” me. when he said he would die if i left him, i thought it passionate. when he started showing up unannounced at my house, because my friends told him my brother’s friends were over, i thought the jealousy was endearing.

then he tried to kill himself when i left town for two days. he was convinced that i would find someone else, in a town where i knew no one. i came back home, and promised i would never leave.

the manipulation and emotional abuse became physical—but only once. he slammed me against a wall after i made a joke about dumping him once i started college. i hid the bruises from my family, for weeks. that was the moment i decided to get out, no matter what happened. for some people, it only takes one time. others need more than one. and some people never make it out alive.

it is not always easy to “just leave.” it is a blessing if you are able to leave, with no consequences.

(via jajatheunwise)

Tags: whyistayed

  • princess tiana: raises money on her own and starts her own business as a black woman in the fucking 20s
  • everyone:
  • princess anna: kinda saves her sister after getting played off as the silly quirky girl the entire movie
  • everyone: WHOA!!!! WHAT A FEMINIST!!!!! HOLY SHIT THE ONLY DISNEY PRINCESS TO EVER HAVE GIRL POWER!!!!!! HOLY SHIT!!!!!! HOLY SHI

Waiting. 

(Source: studioghiblish, via studioghiblish)